Eucharist Church: A vibrant Anglican church in the heart of SF

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Eucharist Church is a vibrant, young church passionate about Christ and His Kingdom. Our mission is to be formed into a community of disciples who live all of life in reference to Christ. We seek to connect ancient forms of worship and classic Christian faith to the lives of 21st-century people. Come join us for worship and discipleship! Visitors are welcome.

The Catechumenate: A big part of our vision for reaching post-Christian culture with the Christian gospel

Rector: Father Ryan (and wife, Elizabeth)
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Director of Table Groups and Outreach: Fr. Joshua Drake (wife, Alicia and daughters)
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Administration, teaching, and liturgy: Fr. Kyle Logan
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What would it be like to live all of life in reference to Christ?

We’re gathering families, children, teenagers, retirees, singles, people coming from all walks of life… to follow Jesus together! We don’t think we’re better than others. We’re just beggars telling each other where we found Bread. Humility and faith are right at the heart of our message. We are, because He IS!

About our name: Eucharist is the ancient Christian word used to describe the central elements of Christian worship: the bread and wine which Christians receive by faith as the living presence of the crucified and resurrected Jesus. The original Greek word simply means “thanksgiving.”

Our Diocese and Bishop: Churches for the Sake of Others is a missionary diocese of the Anglican Church in North America focused on planting new congregations all across America. Within the Bay Area there are currently six sister Anglican congregations who are part of our diocese. Our Bishop is Todd Hunter. Bishop Todd had a wide variety of experience leading in various Christian contexts before being ordained as an Anglican Bishop. He serves as the Rector of Holy Trinity Church in Costa Mesa, California, in addition to his duties as a bishop, speaker, professor, and author. He is married to Debbie and has two adult children.

 

Welcome to San Francisco Anglicans

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Copy of SF Logo Background 3Welcome to San Francisco Anglicans! This website exists to help people get connected to congregations in the Bay Area that are affiliated with the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). If you’d like to get connected with a local priest in San Francisco, please feel free to reach out to Fr. Ryan Jones – ryan@eucharistSF.org or 415.685.3429. If you’re looking more broadly at the Bay Area, please reach out to Fr. Ed McNeill – ed@newanglicanchurch.com who is the Dean offering oversight of the Bay Area congregations connected to Churches for the Sake of Others (ACNA diocese).

If you’re looking for an Anglican congregation in San Francisco itself, Eucharist Church is what you’re looking for (since we’re the only ACNA congregation currently). We are a young congregation made up of Anglican transplants, newly confirmed Anglicans, people who appreciate a three-stream (Evangelical, Charismatic and Sacramental) approach to worship, seekers and more.

We look forward to getting to meet you!

From Orphan Boy to International Missionary

In October 2009, I embarked on a journey to Phnom Penh, Cambodia to use my skills as a therapist to work with survivors of human trafficking and sexual exploitation. I went expecting to work with adolescent female survivors of trafficking and sexual exploitation, but when I arrived in Cambodia, God had a surprise for me. A 6-year-old boy named Pirum had been brought to the shelter a couple of months before. He was the nephew of one of the survivors, and she had rescued him from a very unsafe situation. We were happy he was safe, but it wasn’t ideal. We were in no way set up to manage a 6-year-old boy. The shelter setting was not the healthiest for him, but there were no other options.

He was tiny and malnourished, looking years younger than he was. He had significant dental decay, yet he had a smile that could light up a room! He quickly weaseled his way into my heart, but I was scared to love him because I didn’t know how long I would be in his life. Yet, through a whole series of complex circumstances, Pirum and I ended up living together in the organization’s team house where I eventually became his primary caretaker. During this time, I constantly asked God what he was doing, and each time He told me to trust Him and love on this child. So, I did.

In 2011, I traveled to New Zealand to speak at a mission conference where I met a youth pastor named Guy. We quickly hit it off and fell in love. We were married in January of 2013 and he moved to Cambodia to join me in life and ministry.

We were unsure about what the future held, but we knew we would do whatever it took to continue caring for Pirum for as long as God allowed. We asked God to guide our steps. We agreed that we would try not to worry about the future, but instead just walk through each door that was opened before us. Then, one day, we met a friend who told us that she could help us get legal custody. And she did! A year later, we were given the name of an adoption lawyer who had successfully processed a number of foreign adoption cases in Cambodia.

We met with the lawyer and signed a contract that day. We got in the car and cried. We cried because we never thought it was possible, and we cried because for the first time in this journey we felt hope, but that hope was terrifying. If you don’t hope, you can’t be disappointed. Yet it was clear to us both that God was calling us to hope, so we did.

In God’s faithfulness, on November 7, 2016, Pirum’s adoption was finalized. We gave him the middle name, Isaac, in honor of God’s promises and his perfect timing. Finally, after 7 years of not being able to guarantee safety for Pirum or make any long-term plans for our family, he was ours - forever. image

In December 2017, we moved Pirum and his two little sisters to Wellington, New Zealand to take on a new missionary post as youth mission mobilizers for New Zealand Church Missionary Society. Pirum decided he wanted to be called Isaac in New Zealand as a way of marking this new chapter of life.

This new chapter has allowed us to see quite quickly who God has created Isaac to be. During his confirmation a couple of weeks ago, our bishop saw a vision of Isaac inviting all his friends to the banquet table. When I heard that, my eyes filled with tears because what the bishop didn’t know was that within a couple of weeks of being here, Isaac invited a friend over to have dinner and then to join him at youth group. The next week he invited another. A few weeks ago, we had seven extra kids at our table. We are going to have to bring in more chairs soon because Isaac is quite literally inviting all his friends to the banquet table to meet Jesus!

Perhaps the most important thing for us on this journey has been the community of faith around us. We have laughed, cried, and prayed with some incredible fellow journeyers for the Lord. The stories of what God is doing around the world are what keep us going and what keep the Church thriving. One great place to seek out stories of faith is at the New Wineskins for Global Mission conference. The next New Wineskins conference is September 26-29, 2019 at Ridgecrest, North Carolina. There will be missionaries like us there to share stories of faith from their journeys that can encourage you on yours. Keep running the race of perseverance and don’t run it alone, friends.

The Bentons are SAMS missionaries serving in Wellington, New Zealand. If you would like to learn more about their life and ministry in New Zealand you can follow them on Facebook at “The Bentons in New Zealand” or find them on the SAMS website: http://www.sams-usa.org.

From Orphan Boy to International Missionary

In October 2009, I embarked on a journey to Phnom Penh, Cambodia to use my skills as a therapist to work with survivors of human trafficking and sexual exploitation. I went expecting to work with adolescent female survivors of trafficking and sexual exploitation, but when I arrived in Cambodia, God had a surprise for me. A 6-year-old boy named Pirum had been brought to the shelter a couple of months before. He was the nephew of one of the survivors, and she had rescued him from a very unsafe situation. We were happy he was safe, but it wasn’t ideal. We were in no way set up to manage a 6-year-old boy. The shelter setting was not the healthiest for him, but there were no other options.

He was tiny and malnourished, looking years younger than he was. He had significant dental decay, yet he had a smile that could light up a room! He quickly weaseled his way into my heart, but I was scared to love him because I didn’t know how long I would be in his life. Yet, through a whole series of complex circumstances, Pirum and I ended up living together in the organization’s team house where I eventually became his primary caretaker. During this time, I constantly asked God what he was doing, and each time He told me to trust Him and love on this child. So, I did.

In 2011, I traveled to New Zealand to speak at a mission conference where I met a youth pastor named Guy. We quickly hit it off and fell in love. We were married in January of 2013 and he moved to Cambodia to join me in life and ministry.

We were unsure about what the future held, but we knew we would do whatever it took to continue caring for Pirum for as long as God allowed. We asked God to guide our steps. We agreed that we would try not to worry about the future, but instead just walk through each door that was opened before us. Then, one day, we met a friend who told us that she could help us get legal custody. And she did! A year later, we were given the name of an adoption lawyer who had successfully processed a number of foreign adoption cases in Cambodia.

We met with the lawyer and signed a contract that day. We got in the car and cried. We cried because we never thought it was possible, and we cried because for the first time in this journey we felt hope, but that hope was terrifying. If you don’t hope, you can’t be disappointed. Yet it was clear to us both that God was calling us to hope, so we did.

In God’s faithfulness, on November 7, 2016, Pirum’s adoption was finalized. We gave him the middle name, Isaac, in honor of God’s promises and his perfect timing. Finally, after 7 years of not being able to guarantee safety for Pirum or make any long-term plans for our family, he was ours - forever. image

In December 2017, we moved Pirum and his two little sisters to Wellington, New Zealand to take on a new missionary post as youth mission mobilizers for New Zealand Church Missionary Society. Pirum decided he wanted to be called Isaac in New Zealand as a way of marking this new chapter of life.

This new chapter has allowed us to see quite quickly who God has created Isaac to be. During his confirmation a couple of weeks ago, our bishop saw a vision of Isaac inviting all his friends to the banquet table. When I heard that, my eyes filled with tears because what the bishop didn’t know was that within a couple of weeks of being here, Isaac invited a friend over to have dinner and then to join him at youth group. The next week he invited another. A few weeks ago, we had seven extra kids at our table. We are going to have to bring in more chairs soon because Isaac is quite literally inviting all his friends to the banquet table to meet Jesus!

Perhaps the most important thing for us on this journey has been the community of faith around us. We have laughed, cried, and prayed with some incredible fellow journeyers for the Lord. The stories of what God is doing around the world are what keep us going and what keep the Church thriving. One great place to seek out stories of faith is at the New Wineskins for Global Mission conference. The next New Wineskins conference is September 26-29, 2019 at Ridgecrest, North Carolina. There will be missionaries like us there to share stories of faith from their journeys that can encourage you on yours. Keep running the race of perseverance and don’t run it alone, friends.

The Bentons are SAMS missionaries serving in Wellington, New Zealand. If you would like to learn more about their life and ministry in New Zealand you can follow them on Facebook at “The Bentons in New Zealand” or find them on the SAMS website: http://www.sams-usa.org.

Third Annual Matthew 25 Gathering: Register Now!

Anglicans in North America care about Justice and Mercy. At Archbishop Beach’s initiative, we invite all practitioners, organizational leaders, clergy, and lay leaders to the 3rd Annual Matthew 25 Gathering, a formative time together for those who are, or hope to begin, contending for shalom among vulnerable, marginalized, and under-resourced communities.

The three goals of the Matthew 25 Gathering are: First, to be a learning community; to grow, clarify, and be thoughtfully challenged. Second, to offer encouragement and networking, providing opportunities for strategic, supportive, and generative relationships. Third, to enjoy refreshment, healing, and celebration to proactively fight burn out and discouragement in these intense contexts of ministry and missional outreach.

The Gathering fosters contemplative activism standing in the stream of the global and historic Anglican tradition, which offers a robust theological, prayerful, and missional background from which to draw. While standing on the shoulders of others, there is a lot to learn and discern in seeking to “understand the times and know what to do” (1 Chronicles 12:32).

The focus of each annual gathering is contending for shalom through embodied engagement in works of justice and mercy. Guest speakers are invited along with Anglican voices, making the most of meeting in the Washington, D.C. area.

Dr. David Leong, from Seattle Pacific University, will speak about moving from ‘patterns of exclusion’ to ‘communities of belonging’ and discuss how race and urban geography both make our work of justice and mercy necessary and more difficult. Dr. Leong helps his audience understand the causes of structural sin and offers inspiration to keep working to change those structures while seeking to be agents of reconciliation.

Dr. Vincent Bacote, from Wheaton College, will unpack how to engage the current cultural landscape, how to live out the calling to contend for shalom when civil discourse seems to be lost. Dr. Bacote will encourage discussion of some hopeful tools and vision that help us practically to live both in the kingdom of God and the current North American cultures.

Other Anglicans in North America will share how they are engaged in ministries of justice and mercy as well as lead workshops on the following topics: Anglican Social Teaching; Fundraising and Grants; Holistic Community Development; Homelessness; Peacemaking; Immigration Legal Aid; Soul Care Prayer Practices; Multi-ethnic Church Planting; Caring for the Physically Vulnerable; Creation Care and Agricultural Ministries; Human Trafficking; Refugees; Systemic Injustice and Advocacy as Faithful Response; Elder Care; Addiction and Substance Abuse.

Taking advantage of the Washington, D.C. resources, participants can sign up for a soul care retreat prior to the Gathering and visits afterward to the African American Museum and Museum of the Bible.

This February, the Matthew 25 Gathering promises to be a lively, joyful, thought-provoking, and unifying event. We welcome all those who desire to continue the conversation.

For more information and to register, visit the Gathering website.

Learn more here:

2019 Matthew 25 Gathering from Restoration Anglican Church on Vimeo.